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Price of Hinkley Point C to rise

Concerns have been raised regarding the rising cost of the Hinkley Point C project, and there’s speculation about delays too.

Several media sources have reported that the price of the new nuclear plant will rise by a further £1.5 billion. However, the Guardian reports that the developer, EDF, stated the overspend could exceed 2 billion, leading to a total cost of more than £20 billion for the reactor.

Nevertheless, despite the reported overspend and rumours regarding a delay in the building of the plant, EDF has stated that it still anticipates completing the Somerset-based reactor on schedule by the end of 2025.

The government also insists that the project is still ‘on track’, and it recently reaffirmed its commitment to the nuclear sector.

Hinkley C Progress

Back in March, the French-owned company EDF released details of the progress being made on the ambitious Hinkley Point C nuclear plant, which received government approval earlier in 2017.

In a press release, EDF said there was 1,600 workers on the site daily, work was progressing on the seawall and concrete had been poured ahead of the construction for the power station galleries.

Speaking at the time, Hinkley Point C Project Director, Philippe Bordarier said:

“The regulator’s consent for construction of the first safety-related structure at Hinkley Point C shows our commitment to the highest standards of quality and safety. We’re making good progress on many fronts as a result of the successful collaboration between all our teams.”

Hinkley C Controversy

Plans for the plant have caused controversy from the outset, with environmental groups and parties being among those vocal in their opposition to it.

However, others argue the Hinkley C is essential to job creation and say it will kickstart a new generation of nuclear power in the UK.  And as the UK turns its back on fossil fuels like goal, many believe that nuclear power is the way forward for a cleaner, greener.

Government dedication to nuclear research

In a statement issued by the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the UK’s Business and Energy Secretary, Greg Clark, attempted to allay concerns over future collaboration with Joint European Torus (JET), an organisation that plays a vital part in nuclear fusion research.

Mr Clark stated that “the government is taking every possible step to secure its future and to maintain highly-skilled jobs in the UK.”

The minister also stated that the government would continue to underwrite JET after the UK officially leaves the European Union.

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